Book review on custer died for

Whether you agree with the statement or not, it very clearly defines his view on the subject. He believes that the very idea of trying to solve the problem is the problem to begin with. Native Americans do not need to absorb into what white America thinks of as modern society, they need to be left alone.

Book review on custer died for

Vine Deloria is a Native American author who explains why American Indians are not quietly vanishing the way conquered people are supposed to. You have to laugh If you want to know more about Native Americans than the highly sanitized and stereotyped images on greeting cards and t-shirt, start here.

The interview, written by a white journalist, was all about the ways Native Americans appreciate the earth, in other words, the kind of bullshit that drove Vine up the wall.

Here we go romanticizing the Indian again. When I worked as a biologist in Alaska and we went to Tongass, there were sections of Tongass that were clearcut to nothing, including the riparian areas--down to dirt, nothing left.

It looked like a nuclear bomb. I thoug Recently I read an interview with a Native American academic.

KIRKUS REVIEW

It was the native Alaskan tribal corporation that raped the forests on this island. They destroyed acres and acres of pristine habitat, endangered species. Native American tribes in Montana mine and damage their lands and their relationships with one another--for coal.

I had a native American woman in my ecology class a few years ago that talked to me about it. Vine was ahead of his time, ahead of these developments, but he foresaw the inevitable capitalistic conversion of the Native American--and in this book sets us up for it.

What our ancestors did was cultural genocide. They wiped out the indigenous people of this continent in the most brutal of ways and now we want to go back and "appreciate" the Indian way What the hell choice do they really have at this point? Maybe whites need the myth of the "Indian way" for some reason but how fair is this?

How dare we hold the Indian to higher standards than we hold ourselves-- is what Vine would say, did say.

The Controversies

I had the chance to hear him speak a few times. He had a way too of making us all laugh--at ourselves.

Nov 01,  · Book Review: Custer Died for your Sins by Vine Deloria, Jr. Micah Wonnenberg May 1, Custer Died for Your Sins. For a manifesto written forty years ago, Custer Died for Your Sins is still an informative and relevant text. Vine Deloria, Jr. frames the issues facing American Indian politics since World War II. Through . June , The most celebrated military man in America at that time goes down fighting. The images are ingrained into American culture - Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer in the center of his men on top of a hill, pistols in hand while fierce Indian warriors circle . George Armstrong Custer (December 5, – June 25, ) was a United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the American Civil War and the American Indian benjaminpohle.com in Michigan and Ohio, Custer was admitted to West Point in , where he graduated last in his class in With the outbreak of the Civil War, Custer was called to serve with the Union Army.

Vine had a huge influence on me. Mention of this book, along with the TMWGang, is in my own novel. Vine was a Truth Teller. How I miss our Truth Tellers. Land was stolen, treaties were broken and even to this day Native American land is still expropriated and exploited.

The question is for any group with this history, what are you going to do about it? So what are you going to do about it?

They are as he writes, nationalists: They are interested in the progress of the tribe. Surely raising awareness of this issue, a vital one to the Native American community, can only be a positive rather than retreating into isolation.

Indicative of this isolation is his support for Barry Goldwater. Margins compiled by blacks, Indians, and Mexicans for Democratic candidates have been incredible. In it took a strong Indian to support Goldwater in spite of his publicized heroic flights to the Navajo and his superb collection of Hopi Kachina dolls.

But what is the alternative?

Book review on custer died for

In an ideal world yes, the government would give you money with zero oversight and never interfere.Custer Died for your Sins is a book that I'm glad I read.

It tells a history from the Indian point of view and adds wit and human to make it more palatable. This book covers the many broken promises and treaties, the forced education, and social policies forced against the Native/5. Auto Suggestions are available once you type at least 3 letters.

Use up arrow (for mozilla firefox browser alt+up arrow) and down arrow (for mozilla firefox browser alt+down arrow) to review and enter to select/5(4). George Armstrong Custer (December 5, – June 25, ) was a United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the American Civil War and the American Indian benjaminpohle.com in Michigan and Ohio, Custer was admitted to West Point in , where he graduated last in his class in With the outbreak of the Civil War, Custer was called to serve with the Union Army.

A young Sioux, an ex-Marine, a son and grandson of Christian Indians and the graduate of a Lutheran seminary, he catalogues the wrongs of the white invader and despoiler.

He notes the treaties violated and the promises broken to take more and more land; the idiocies of visiting anthropologists who. Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto [Jr. Vine Deloria] on benjaminpohle.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

In his new preface to this paperback edition, the author observes, The Indian world has changed so substantially since the first publication of this book that some things contained in it seem new again/5(63).

Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto [Jr. Vine Deloria] on benjaminpohle.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

In his new preface to this paperback edition, the author observes, The Indian world has changed so substantially since the first publication of this book that some things contained in Reviews:

From the Editor | Men With Custer